Electronic Structure and Many-Body Physics from Photoemission Experiments (2018)


ECTS credits:
5

Course parameters:
Language: English
Level of course: PhD course
Time of year: Autumn 2018 (weeks 37-44, see below)
No. of contact hours/hours in total incl. preparation, assignment(s) or the like: 6 hours per week for lectures and exercises / 136.5 hours total
Capacity limits: 10 participants

Objectives of the course:
The course will provide the students with a theoretical and practical basis to understand and analyze the electronic structure and many-body effects as measured in photoemission spectra from a wide range of solid state materials ranging from conventional bulk metals and semiconductors to exotic quantum and two-dimensional materials.


Learning outcomes and competences:
At the end of the course, the student should be able to:

  • give an account of the type of electronic properties and many-body interactions that can be extracted from photoemission experiments
  • describe the underlying physics of photoemission spectra, particularly the spectral function of solids
  • analyze and extract electronic dispersion and linewidth parameters from experimental data
  • understand and apply Igor Pro software to simulate and fit the photoemission intensity from selected materials
  • describe topical materials and problems that are addressed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy
  • know the basis of modern technical developments of energy-, momentum-, time-, space- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopies 


Compulsory programme:
Participation in lectures and exercises and handing in three projects.
 

Course contents:

  • The components of the photoemission intensity will be introduced: Spectral function, self-energy and matrix elements.
  • Many-body effects in a range of simple and advanced materials and examples of how to extract them from experimental data.
  • Advanced problems that can be addressed with high energy- and momentum-resolution ARPES: Correlated electron phenomena, polarons, superconductivity, charge density waves, Fermi liquids, Luttinger liquids, spin-related interactions, topological phases of matter.
  • Time- and spatially-resolved photoemission: Non-equilibrium dynamics, thermalisation and rate equation analysis, 4D dark-field imaging with band structure and prospects for new materials.
  • An emphasis is placed on practical simulations and analysis of existing experimental data from topical material systems using Igor Pro software.


Prerequisites:
Three years of Physics studies 


Name of lecturer:
Søren Ulstrup
  

Type of course/teaching methods:
The course will contain lectures, literature reading, exercises and three take-home projects with elements of literature study, numerical programing in Igor Pro and analysis of existing experimental data. Exercises will contain a mix of problem solving and literature presentations/discussions.


Literature:
Scientific papers and reviews. The books “Photoelectron Spectroscopy: Principles and Applications, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 3rd edition (2003)” by Stefan Hüfner and “Very High Resolution Photoelectron Spectroscopy (Lecture Notes in Physics), Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg (2007)” edited by Stefan Hüfner are useful references.


Course homepage:
The course will have a Blackboard page.


Course assessment:
Pass/no pass based on active participation in exercises as well as completion of three take-home projects.


Provider:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University


Special comments on this course:
A license for Wavemetrics Igor Pro version 7 or 8 is required to attend the course.


Time:
Weeks 37-44 (except week 42), ie. within the period 10 September to 4 November 2018.
Schedule will be determined at a later time point taking participants' wishes into account.


Place:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University.


Registration:
Deadline for registration is 15 August 2018. Information regarding admission will be sent out no later than two days later.

For registration: ulstrup@phys.au.dk

If you have any questions, please contact Søren Ulstrup, e-mail: ulstrup@phys.au.dk